Recognising Clinical Trials

On the 20th of May each year we celebrate International Clinical Trials Day. At GMRF our Clinical Trials Unit (CTU) is award winning for providing research partners with first-class conduct, management and coordination of multi-centre national and international clinical research trials. The positive outcomes of some trials have changed the lives of countless participants, and this could not be possible without support from Greenslopes Private Hospital.

Clinical trials are a vital part of the research ecosystem. Without them, we can’t determine if new treatments developed in labs or using animal models will work in humans. Most modern treatments are a direct result of clinical trials. In addition to driving innovative research, clinical trials give options to participants who may not have any other alternatives.

Clinical trials can help

  • Discover new treatments and test if they’re safe
  • Find ways to detect diagnosis
  • Reduce chance of developing disease recurrence
  • Show researchers was does and doesn’t work in humans
  • Give information that can’t be found in lab or animal research.

In 2006, the GMRF CTU was simply one Clinical Trial Coordinator using borrowed equipment. 15 years later, the team has 19 members including 8 Clinical Trial Coordinators. Learn more about the CTU team.

The GMRF CTU in 2021

  • Is running close to 30 clinical trials
  • Offers trials in oncology, liver and respiratory illness
  • Works with over 100 years collective experience in clinical trials

Learn more about the CTU or get involved today.

 

Do you know about the first clinical trial?

Historians say the first clinical trial was conducted on a ship in 1747. When scurvy killed more British sailors than foreign armies did, surgeon mate James Lind recruited 12 scurvy riddled sailors for his test and sorted them into 6 pairs. Each pair was given a different remedy so test what rememdy would effectively treat scurvy. Some sailors were given citrus fruits and recovered promptly. Read more about James Lind’s story